Friday, November 30, 2012

Queensland First Sideface Plate Proofs

Please note I am currently updating the individual plate proof pages to reflect the information provided by Ken Scudder and Alan Griffith. Once done, I will update this page to reflect that information

In August 1878 the plate of the one penny postage stamp was finished. The original proof sheet was printed in a reddish-brown shade on thick card paper and bore little resemblance to the existing Queensland stamps.

A similar proof sheet, printed in blue, was submitted at the same time, as a sample of colour for the twopence.


Proofs were also made of the 4d, 6d and 1 shilling stamps. The 4d proof was printed in an orange-yellow colour and the 6d was of a chrome-green, a shade that was never exactly reproduced in the stamps printed for use.

Robson Lowe in 1962 provided the following information:

On the Crown Q (first type) paper.

On the Crown Q (Second type) paper.

Originally I had all the issues in the one post here but as I have found more material it has become too unwieldy so I have split them up.

Examples of the individual values are located here:


Queensland First Sideface Plate Proofs - 4d.

Here are some examples of the 1st sideface 4d. plate proof. For general information on the 1st sideface plate proofs see here

These are known as follows:
  • imperforate on thin card in a bright orange-yellow colour, prepared around February 1879
  • Imperforate on crown over Q type II paper in a dull yellow colour, prepared around January 1880
  • Perforated on Crown over gummed Q Type II paper, defaced with blue crayon or black ink

4d orange-yellow imperforate plate proof block of 12 (4x3) on thin card from lower-right of the sheet. Ex Capman, Colonel Evans and Manning

4d orange-yellow imperforate plate proof block of 4 on thin card. Seen at Prestige Philately auction no 142. Ex Griffith


4d orange-yellow imperforate plate proof on thin card. Ex Griffith


4d Imperforate plate proof pair in orange-yellow on thick wove paper. Ex Sir Gawaine Baillie. Seen on Millennium Philatelic Auctions no 1 lot no 644


4d Imperforate plate proof pair in orange-yellow on thin card. Seen in a private collection


4d Imperforate plate proof pair in orange-yellow on thin card. Seen in a private collection


4d Imperforate plate proof pair in orange-yellow on thin card. Seen in a private collection


4d imperforate plate proof pair in yellow-orange on thin card. Seen at Prestige Philately auction no 139 lot no 320


4d imperforate plate proof pair in yellow-orange on thin card. In my collection


Imperforate plate proofs on thin card comprising 4d in 
orange-yellow and on ungummed watermarked paper in orange-yellow. Seen on the Internet


Plate Proofs imperforate 4d orange-yellow from base of the sheet, blue-pencil notation in sheet margin on gummed watermarked paper. Seen at Phoenix Auctions no 17 and now in a private collection


4d Imperforate plate proof. Ex Butler



4d 
orange-yellow SG 141 block of 4. Courtesy of Dave Elsmore. However, this could be a fiscal usage


4d bright orange-yellow on watermarked, gummed paper defaced with blue crayon. Courtesy Dave Elsmore


4d bright orange-yellow on watermarked, gummed paper defaced with blue crayon

Queensland First Sideface Plate Proofs - 6d.

Here are some examples of the 1st sideface 6d. plate proof. For general information on the 1st sideface plate proofs see here

In February 1879, the Government Engraver, William Knight, submitted for approval to the Colonial Treasurer, proofs of the 6d. These were printed on thin card, imperforate, in a yellow-green colour. The submission was forwarded to the Postmaster-General, who returned it on 7 March 1880 with his approval, but suggested the green should be more decided. It would appear that one sheet was produced, with the bottom 50 stamps surviving as an intact multiple.

The supply of the new inks was received from England in November 1880, with a green shade known from March 1881.


Imperforate proofs for several values, printed on the watermarked paper, in these new inks, were retained by William Knight, including at least one pair of the 6d. Some are defaced with blue crayon and some with ink lines presumably to distinguish them from the issued stamps. The 6d. stamp was issued to the public in December 1879. Judging by the examples shown here in the yellow-green and green shades, some of these may well have been colour trials.

Plate proofs of the 6d. are known printed in black. The ony one I have seen is perforated on 
 Crown over Q Type II paper

Perforated plate proofs of the 6d. are known with blue crayon cancelling marks. These were made during normal printings.


To summarise:
  • Imperforate on thin card - yellow-green
  • Imperforate on Crown over Q Type II paper - yellow-green and green, some defaced with blue crayon and ink
  • Perforated on Crown over gummed Q Type II paper - green, defaced with blue crayon
  • Plate proof on Crown over Q Type II paper in black

Imperforate on thin card


6d. yellow-green block of fifty Imperforate Plate Proofs on Thin Card , being the complete lower five rows of the sheet with [83] showing the beginning of damage to second "e" of "Queensland". Positions no 71-120. Stunning.Ex Griffith. Click on the link to see it in hi-resolution


6d Die II imperforate marginal block of 6 (2 x 3) in bright yellow-green on thin card, minor tone spots on the reverse. Ex Manning


6d. proofs on card. From the L'Estrange collection at the Queensland Museum


6d. marginal from the top of the sheet Imperforate unwatermarked plate proof on thin card. From my collection


6d yellow-green plate proof pair, no watermark, seen in a private collection. Ex Griffith


6d. imperforate Plate Proof block of 4 on Thin Card. Ex Griffith

Imperforate on Crown over Q Type II paper


Imperforate Plate Proof pair on Crown over Q Type II Paper 6d. yellow-green pair cancelled by blue crayon strokes. Ex Griffith


Imperforate Plate Proof pair on Crown over Q Type II Paper 6d. deep green pair cancelled by blue crayon strokes. Ex Griffit
h


6d Die II imperforate marginal vertical pair from the right of the sheet in green on gummed watermarked paper. Ex Manning


Here is an imperforate proof on thin paper with a pencil line across it. Seen at Prestige Philately auction no 152


6d yellow-green plate proof vertical pair, seen at Phoenix Auctions



6d. on watermarked paper, traces of blue crayon. Courtesy of Dave Elsmore, Queensland stamp collecting Facebook group



6d Imperforate pair, watermarked paper. Courtesy of Carl Burnett, Queensland stamp collecting Facebook group


6d Imperforate pair, watermarked paper. Courtesy of Carl Burnett, Queensland stamp collecting Facebook group



6d. Imperforate. Dated 11 March 1881 on the reverse. Courtesy of Dave Elsmore, Queensland stamp collecting Facebook group




6d yellow-green plate proof pair, ex Griffith


6d plate proof pair. Seen at Status Stamps auction no 223 lot no 1923


6d. proof on watermarked gummed paper. From the collection of Dave Elsmore

Proof in black



6d. perforate proof on Crown over Q Type II paper in black. No gum. Image supplied by Dave Elsmore

Perforated on Crown over gummed Q Type II paper

6d. proof block of 4 on watermarked gummed paper with blue crayon cancel. From the collection of Dave Elsmore

Queensland First Sideface Plate Proofs - 1 shilling

Here are some examples of the 1st sideface one shilling plate proof. For general information on the 1st sideface plate proofs see here.

The 1 shilling is very rare as it was the last stamp in the series, issued about April 1880. The proofs for the other stamps in the series were produced in 1879, before this stamp was needed and that is why they are so rare for this issue. 


According to Ken Scudder, there were two groups of proofs, and I have only seen singles, no pairs or blocks:

  • Mauve imperforate colour proofs watermarked Crown over Q type 2 paper approved around April 1880 
  • Deep reddish violet Imperforate colour proofs watermarked Crown over Q type 2 paper from around April 1881
Alan Griffith also notes a perforated deep mauve colour proof defaced with blue crayon on Crown over Q type 2  watermarked paper dated about March 1881.

Imperforate singles in several shades are also known and these are probably proofs as well.


1 shilling imperforate mauve plate proof on watermarked ungummed Crown Q type 2 paper. Seen on Stampboards

1 shilling imperforate mauve plate proof on watermarked Crown Q type 2 paper. Ex Alan Griffith


1 shilling imperforate violet plate proof with faint vertical pencil line on gummed watermarked paper. Seen at Phoenix Auctions

1 shilling imperforate violet and mauve plate proofs. Seen on Stampboards


1/- pale lilac, margins just clear to large, unused; 1/- pale lilac, huge margins at top & base but cut-into elsewhere, fiscal cancel; all apparently imperforate. Ex Manning

1/- deep violet with parts of 3 adjoining units but touched at the right, unused. Ex Manning




1 shilling mauve proof. Courtesy of Dave Elsmore, Queensland stamp collecting Facebook group. Indistinct date 


One shilling mauve imperforate on two sides, perforated on the upper and bottom side. Possibly a proof? Seen on Stampboards

Wednesday, November 28, 2012

Queensland 1st Sideface post card

Here is an extract from an article by A. F. Bassett Hull on the design and issue of post cards in Queensland in 1880. "The Stamps of Queensland, chapter 8, Post Cards, Wrapper and Registered Envelope." It appeared in Vindin's Philatelic Monthly23 July 1894, pp. 171-2

1. POST CARDS.

An Act to provide for the issue of Post Cards and Postal Notes (44 Vic. No. 2), was passed in September, 1880.

This Act provided by:—

Sec. 2. The Postmaster-General may, from time to time, issue single post cards, each bearing thereon a postage stamp of the value of one penny; and also double or reply post cards, each bearing thereon two postage stamps of the same value.
Except as aforesaid, a post card issued under the provisions of this Act shall be deemed a letter within the meaning of the principal Act. (The Postal Act of 1871.)

Sec. 8. Subject to the provisions of this Act, the Governor-in-Council may from time to time make regulations for the issue and transmission of post cards , ... and every such regulation shall, after publication in the Gazette, have the force of law.

The Gazette of the 30th October, 1880, contained the following notification:—

His Excellency the Administrator of the Government, with the advice of the Executive Council, has been pleased to approve of the Regulations hereto annexed providing for the issue of Post Cards, under the provisions of The Post Cars and Postal Note Act of1880.

C. HARDIE BUZACOTT. Brisbane, 28th October, 1880.

Post Card Regulations.

The object of the Post Card.
1. Post cards are designed to facilitate letter correspondence and provide for the transmission through the post of short communications, either printed or written in pencil or ink. They may, therefore, be used for orders for goods, invitations, notices, receipts, acknowledgements, price - lists, and other requirements of business, or social life, and the matter required to be conveyed may be either in writing or in print, or in both.

Description.
2. Post cards will be of two kinds, namely :—

(1) The single post card, with a penny stamp thereon, and containing space;

(a.) On one side for the address only of the recipient.
(b)   On the other side for the communication and the signature of the sender.

(2) The double (or reply) post card, with two penny stamps thereon.
Treated as letters.

3. The postmaster will treat the post card as a sealed letter, and not as a packet, with the following exception, namely :—

In no case will an unclaimed post card be returned to the writer, but will be sent to the Dead Letter Office, thirty days after receipt, there to be destroyed.

At the request of the person named in the address upon it, a post card may be re-addressed by the postmaster in the same manner as a letter, on payment of one penny additional postage.

Postage Fee.
4. The stamp impressed on a post card will be the fee chargeable thereon for its transmission within the colony.

Issued exclusively by the Department.
5. Post cards will be issued exclusively by the Department, and may be obtained at any post office at their face value. Cards which contain any written or printed matter of the nature of personal correspondence other than the address, if issued by private persons, cannot be passed through the post office at less than letter postage, as they will not be considered ‘Post Cards’ within the meaning of the law.

Address only on one side.
6. No written or printed matter will be allowed on- the side of the post card used for the address, except the address itself, and nothing should be pasted, gummed, or attached to the card. When this rule is disregarded the post card will not be forwarded, except at letter rate, with a second rate as fine.

Stamping.
7. A post card must be stamped by postmasters on the side intended for the address, and so as not to interfere therewith.

Single cards not returnable.
8. A request (written thereon) to return a post card, which does not bear space and stamp for reply, will be disregarded.

Requisition was made for a supply of both single and double postcards on the 23rd of October, 1880, and, although they were supplied and issued to the public on the 28th of that month, they were not entered in the accountant’s receipt and issue book until September, 1882.

The cards were designed and lithographed by the Government engraver.

The design is as follows:

Three-quarter face of Queen, being a transfer from the steel plate of the first issue of postage stamps, with double outer oval line enclosing name of colony above and value below, separated by arabesques as in the postage stamps, but the lettering larger and freshly drawn. The details of the arabesques are more closely copied on the left than on the right side. In making the transfer, the fine background of crossed lines in the central oval disappeared, and the ground became solid. A dash-shaped period is placed after the value. This stamp is placed in the right upper corner of the card. At the top of the card in the centre there is a fancy oblong label with moirĂ© groundwork, bearing two lines of inscription, first, "POST CARD" in plain Roman capitals; second, "QUEENSLAND, AUSTRALIA" in coloured block letters. Below the label, and between two straight lines, of which the upper one is shorter and thicker than the lower, is "THE ADDRESS ONLY T0 BE WRITTEN ON THIS SIDE.) In the left upper corner are the Royal arms, crown, supporters, and motto. Lower down to the left is the word "To” in script type, followed by four dotted lines for the address. The design of the card is completed by a fancy ornamental border composed of intertwined cords.

The design of both single and reply cards is the same, the latter being simply two conjoint impressions of the single card, one above the other, both on the same side, and neither folded nor perforated. The card used for the first issue was thick yellowish buff, slightly surfaced. Both single and reply cards were lithographed in a bright carmine rose colour, the sizes of the cards being (as cut) 5½ + 3 7/12 inches, and 5+ 7⅜ inches respectively.

From time to time supplies of card were obtained from various sources, and the quality and colour differed considerably. The second printing was on white card, and the colour of the impressions varied from carmine rose to pale pink. About 1884 the colour changed to lake on white and pale buff card, and later printings were in dull pink on thinner surfaced light buff and white card.

The reply card did not meet with much success. The first requisition was for 3,200 single and 900 double cards, and apparently no further supplies of double cards were required. Consequently the later varieties of card and shades of impression would apply to single cards only.
--------------------------------------------------------------

Here is an extract from an Alan Griffiths’ article published in Gibbons Stamp Monthly, October 2006, p.79. The article was entitled “Queensland Postal Stationery: A review of the issues to 1901.”

“It was in 1879 that Queensland made the decision to introduce items of prepaid postal stationery and a few essays were printed bearing images of the 1879 1d. postage stamps. Such cards are much sought after as they never appeared as issued items. An issued Id. card bearing an amended version of the Chalon Head design was initially made available in 1880. It was intended that these cards should only prepay the postage to the neighbouring colonies, with Western Australia and Tasmania being excluded from the postcard rate of 1d. It was also intended that postcards should incorporate a facility for a reply by the recipient which had been prepaid by the original sender. Essays were prepared but not adopted and it has been suggested by early collectors and authors that the 1880 card was, in fact, sold in joined pairs, which afforded the opportunity for the addressee to remove the lower part of the card - presumably by cutting with scissors—and send a reply. No such pairs are recorded, although I do own a single card which may have been cut from the bottom of such a pair. Versions of this basic card were further printed in 1882 and 1886, on different stock and in various shades of red, ranging from rose to vermilion. There were also variations in the size, type and shade of the card stock employed.”


1880 essay for a ½d+½d reply postal card with two impressions of Bell's ½d essay Type C (with void background and corrected 'Q') both on the face, the divided address panel endorsed 'NAME & ADDRESS OF PERSON TO WHOM SENT' at left & 'NAME & ADDRESS OF SENDER' at right and also 'Before reposting please obliterate this address' at lower-left & "Over" at lower-right, the reverse also divided & headed 'MESSAGE TO BE SENT' at left & 'REPLY' at right and also 'When no reply is required both Spaces may be occupied' at lower-left & 'The Card must not be cut' at lower-right, manuscript "Essay 1880" in the upper margin.

Ex Ron Butler: sold for £3525 at auction in 2005. Almost certainly modeled on a private essay for a British ½d+½d reply postal card on which both stamp impressions
 were also on the face. Neither of these innovative, but confusing, ideas was adopted. Sold for $14,000 at the Prestige Philately Bernard Manning sale in June 2009.

1880 Essay for a 1d+1d reply postal card with two impressions of the First Sideface 1d - the second being Die II - both on the face, the divided address panel endorsed 'NAME & ADDRESS OF PERSON TO WHOME SENT' [sic; the offending 'E' being crossed-through] at left & 'NAME & ADDRESS OF SENDER' at right and also 'Before reposting please obliterate this address' at lower-left & 'Over' at lower-right, the reverse with pencilled "Communication only" at left & "Reply only" at right, manuscript "Essay 1880" in the upper margin, vertical fold apparently to simulate a printed rule on the reverse. Ex Ron Butler. Again, almost certainly modeled on a private essay for a British reply postal card on which both stamp impressions were also on the face. Neither of these innovative, but confusing, ideas was adopted. Auctioned by Prestige Philately in December 2012 here.

Unused post card from an early printing.

An unused example where the card was not cut straight.

A used example date stamped Bundaberg 17 July 1888 and addressed to the Swedish Royal Consul, Sydney, N.S.W. The writing on the side says 17 July 1888, E. Huttman (?) re letters none.

And the reverse. Dated Brisbane 20 July 1888. The text reads: If any letters are arrived to your office in my address please to send them up to Bundaberg Post Office P.R. Bundaberg Queensland. 17 July 1888. Respectfully E. Huttman (?)