Friday, October 14, 2011

6d. Queensland Cliche type

The 6d. sheet of 120 stamps was composed of 30 recurring cliches or dies. Each cliche was a single die-impressed mould of 4 types.  It was derived from the Original 1d Die and the border lines of the spandrels were re-engraved to strengthen them. The "SIX PENCE" was separately engraved on each of the four subjects of the new quadruple die. The "P" of "PENCE" was located in a similar position to that on Original 1d. Die but, as the
"SIX" only occupied three letters, the words of value were more centred.

According to Ken Scudder, the distinguishing features of the 4 types are:

Type 1

  • Break in frame below "P" of "PENCE".
  • Right leg of the 2nd "N" of "QUEENSLAND" tends to be curved and short.
  • Downstroke of the "P" of "PENCE" is straight and its base rounded.
  • Centre bar of the lst "E" of "PENCE" is short, and the lengths of the top and bottom bars of the 2nd "E" are
  • nearly equal..
  • Curved line of the lower left spandrel does not join the vertical frame line. 
  • Curved line of both lower spandrels are not joined to the lower frame lines.

Type 2

  • In the right side ornament, the "reversed S" is undamaged 
  • Curved lines of both lower spandrels are not joined to the lower frame lines. 
  • Curved line of the upper left spandrel joins the horizontal line above.
  • Base of the downstroke of the "P" of "PENCE" is cut square.

Type 3

  • Top frame of the top left spandrel is broken above "U" of "QUEENSLAND".
  • Blob of colour in front of the point of the bust.
  • Break in the thin coloured vertical frame line at top right corner.
  • Horizontal frame line below the lower right spandrel joins the oval.
  • Top of the "S" of "SIX" is small and the opening very narrow.
  • No break in the left vertical frame line at the lower corner. 

Type 4

  • Foot of the "P" of "PENCE" is cut away at an acute angle.
  • Nick in the lower frame almost under the "S" of "SIX".
  • Curved line of the lower right spandrel joins the horizontal line below.

I have shown the most prominent characteristics in the block of 4 below

Type 1, Type 2
Type 3, Type 4


6d Queensland sideface colours

The 1879 6d. green comes in deep green and yellow green shades. The prices in Gibbons are similar. 5 pounds for the deep green used (SG 142) and 4.5 pounds for the yellow green used (SG 143). They are Perf 12 line. Watermark Crown and Q W. 6  Basset Hull in Vindins Philatelic Monthly, Jan 20 1894, pp. 83 -85 states that the old Chalon 6d. was issued up till 6 December 1879; that specimen copies of the 6d 1st sideface are marked 1879 and so it is very unlikely that any copies were issued before 1880. The first 6d. issue was pale yellow green. New supplies of ink were received in November 1880 and proofs were submitted as follows: 6d, deep green, issued March 1881. The stamps are Perf 12 line. Watermark Crown and Q W. 6 and the centering was not always very good.

Deep green

Yellow green

An example of poor centering on a yellow green shade

Wednesday, October 12, 2011

1 shilling Queensland varieties

There is one easily distinguished constant variety (position no 76) known. As well, Ken Scudder has identified a number of plate flaws. There are also numerous non-constant flaws. The constant flaws identified by Scudder, with their position numbers on the proof sheet are:

  • No. l - a line through the centre of the "D" and a solid upper part to the "A" of "QUEENSLAND". A Type I.
  • No. 2 - the Type II line flaw as a continuation of the right limb of the "H" of "SHILLING" most prominent; plus a flaw on the "S" of "QUEENSLAND" not unlike a "$".
  • No. 10 - Type II line flaw as a continuation of the right limb of the "H" of "SHILLING".
  • No. 12 - outer frame is broken at the lower left corner, small flaws on the "EN" of "QUEENSLAND" and the "N" of "SHILLING". A Type IV.
  • No. 70 - Type II line flaw as a continuation of the right limb of the "H" of "SHILLING".
  • No. 76 - Thick, and partly filled in "NG" of "SHILLING", upper part of "S" also filled in. A Type IV.
  • No. 109 - Large white flaw obliterating the "N" of "SHILLING". A Type I. (Hard to believe this is a constant flaw as I have not seen any others)

Two other flaws identified by Scudder but not tied to a position number are:
  • a white flaw on the upper part of the "E" of "ONE". A Type III.
  • a 9.0mm long white vertical line inside the oval between the "Q" of "QUEENSLAND" and the "O" of "ONE". A Type I.

Examples


  • The constant variety, a thickened and distorted G found on the later mauve printings is position no 76

The bottom stamp shows the distorted "G" as well as a thickened top "S" in Shilling


The top left stamp shows the distorted "G" as well as a thickened top "S" in Shilling 



  • No. l Has a line through the centre of the "D" and a solid upper part to the "A" of "QUEENSLAND". A Type I.


There are many other examples in this issue where the "A" is partially filled in as well

  • No. 2 Has the Type II line flaw as a continuation of the right limb of the "H" of "SHILLING" most prominent; plus a flaw on the "S" of "QUEENSLAND" not unlike a "$".
Part of a pair showing the continuation of the right limb of the "H" of "SHILLING" and the flaw on the "S" of "QUEENSLAND"

  • No. 10 The Type II line flaw as a continuation of the right limb of the "H" of "SHILLING". or
  • No. 70 The Type II line flaw as a continuation of the right limb of the "H" of "SHILLING".
The best way to distinguish these two is that with position no 70 the top of the "H" is also distorted

Position no 10. A scratch above the "H"


Position no 70. A scratch above the "H" with a deformed top right hand side "H"


No. 12 - outer frame is broken at the lower left corner, small flaws on the "EN" of "QUEENSLAND" and the "N" of "SHILLING". A Type IV.


From a reconstructed sheet


  • No. 109 - Large white flaw obliterating the "N" of "SHILLING". A Type I.

From a reconstructed sheet


  • No 75 "Q" and "U" joined

Copy on the left courtesy of Dave Elsmore with a reconstructed sheet example on the right



An example from a specimen block of 4


Another example


Non-constant varieties include:


A very pronounced example of the distorted "G"


A pronounced scrape on the cheek

A break in the bottom fame under the 'L' of Shilling, The first 'L' of Shilling also has a white bob under it. This may be a constant flaw as I have seen two different examples

The 2nd examples seen in the Queensland Stamp Collecting Facebook Group 

A blob under the "D" of Queensland 


A blank area in the Queen's hair, courtesy of Dave Elsmore

1 shilling Queensland fiscal cancellations

This issue was mainly used for fiscal purposes.

Here is a lovely fiscally used pair on piece

Here is one with a Bank of New South Wales fiscal cancellation

1 shilling Queensland postally used

This value postally used is scarce and would most probably only have been used for overseas destinations 
Postally used pair with a Brisbane datestamp and QL cancel
Postally used pair with indistinct barred numeral

Postally used pair, QL cancel

Here is one with a barred numeral. Type 4. Barred numeral 256, Type 2 a (7 mm). Allocated to Port Douglas and rated 2R by Bernard Manning

1 shilling Queensland multiples

Multiples are scarce. Here are some examples

A stunning fiscal block of 36, dated 10 July 1883, positions no 42-50, 52-60, 62-70, 72-80. Seen in a private collection



A fiscal block of 6 from my collection


Another block of 4 fiscally used and dated 3 January 1882


A block of 4 with a manuscript / fiscal cancellation



1/- pale lilac SG 145 rejoined block of 4 (two vertical pairs). Ex Manning


Fiscally used strip of 5 dated 27 May 1881. The 5th stamp has the thick "G". From the collection of Dave Elsmore


Fiscally used strip of 5 dated 10 May 1883. From the collection of Dave Elsmore


A fiscal block of 4 from my collection


A fiscal strip of 4 from my collection 


Another fiscal strip of 4 from my collection 


A mint strip of 3 from my collection 

A used block of 4 seen in a private collection


A fiscal block of 4 courtesy of Dave Elsmore. The stamp says The Queensland National Bank Limited - Townsville



A stunning reconstructed sheet of the 1 shilling issue, with the top half above and the bottom half underneath it. It is not known what happened to this sheet as this image was taken sometime before 1935 in preparation for a volume of the Queensland sidefaces that was never completed. In the London Philatelist, June 1910, p. 149, it is mentioned where Mr L. L. R Hausberg (1872 - 1917) showed his Queensland collection, including "Two reconstructed sheets of the 1s, 1879 issue, one being made up of overlapping pairs and blocks and the other almost entirely of unused specimens." So this one must be his first reconstructed sheet



Another stunning reconstruction seen at Spink auction no 16030, lot no 1156. Spink Auction: 16030 - 1/- lilac to violet shades, reconstructed pane of sixty (10 x 6), mostly unused, including three pairs and an irregular block of five; mixed condition but many are fine. S.G. 144-145


A fiscal block of 4 dated 21 April 1882, with an attempt made to remove the cancellation on the left hand side stamps. Seen in the Queensland stamp collecting Facebook Group

1 s. pale lilac, wmk. Crown and Q (Type 6), an unused block of four of good colour, some hinge reinforcement otherwise fresh and fine, with part original gum. Seen at Corinphila auction November 2017

1 shilling Queensland cliche type

This issue was derived from the 1d. Die 2 and was the last value of this series to be issued. The letters "One Shilling" was separately engraved on each of the four subjects of the new die.

Ken Scudder distinguishes the 4 types of each cliche / mould as follows:

Type 1

  • Curve of the lower left spandrel merges with the vertical frame line. 
  • Either a small coloured flaw below the "O" of "ONE" or the "O" is joined to the oval below. Also, often a small
  • coloured flaw above the "O".
  • "ONE" closest to the left ornament.
  • "S" of "SHILLING" has a long, thick bottom stroke.
  • Frame line below lower right spandrel most often joins the outer oval.

Type 2

  • In the right side ornament the top of the "reversed S" is damaged. 
  • Both curved lines of the lower spandrels join the lower frame lines. 
  • The right limb of "H" and the 2nd "I" of "SHILLING" touch the oval above.
  • Often a line flaw in the shading above "H", as a continuation of its right limb.
  • Heel of the lst "L" of "SHILLIN G" touches the oval below.
  • Spot of colour on white oval, in front of and level with the eye.


Type 3

  • Break in the left vertical frame line at bottom corner.
  • Cross bar of the "H" of "SHILLIN G" is set low.
  • "E" of "ONE" has a longer lower bar.
  • Most often, the heel of the lst "L" of "SHILLING" touches the oval below.
  • Right side ornament most often has an extra bud at the bottom.
  • Often, a small white flaw from the base of the neck.


Type 4

  • Curved line of the lower right spandrel joins the horizontal line below at an acute angle and, possibly, by only a
  • fine line. 
  • "NG" of "SHILLING" set close.
  • "O" of "ONE" large and usually joins the oval above.
  • Often the outer frame is flawed at the top left corner.



The most obvious of these features are shown below:
Type 1. The bottom of the O touches the white line outside the oval


Type 2. The top of the right limb of the H touches the right line around the oval. The I also touches the right line of the oval
Type 3. The horizontal stroke on the first L of shilling is cut short and there is a second bud on the lowest right-hand scroll. Under the first L there is usually a white bump

Type 4. The top of the O cuts the white line around the oval and the letters NG are close together. Note the Sydney, NSW datestamp

1 shilling Queensland Sideface - colours

The 1 shilling Queensland sideface stamp was issued around March 1880. Perf 12 line. Watermark Crown and Q W. 6. The colours were deep violet (Stanley Gibbons 144) and pale lilac (Stanley Gibbons 145) and the centering was sometimes poor, causing misperforation. There were four recurring types in the sheets of 120 stamps (10 x12). The colours of these stamps are interesting. Robson Lowe in 1962 talks about a deep violet and a lilac. My 1993 simplified Gibbons mentions a mauve colour and my 2008 British Commonwealth Gibbons mentions deep violet and pale lilac. I have looked at all my stamps and compared them to the SG colour key and none of them exhibit these colours. I know these are the original colours, so 130 years later the colours have mutated slightly.  An article By Basset Hull in Vindins Philatelic Monthly, Jan 20 1894, p. 85 regarding the 1 shilling printing states that the original printing was deep violet, approved in April 1881 and issued on 4 May 1881. In all 163,440 stamps were printed on 5 different occasions and the shade of colour varies very considerably from pale cold lilac to deep violet! Apparently some of the stamps of this issue were printed with analine inks and show up as yellow when viewed in ultra violet light.

Kenneth Scudder, "Queensland Postage Stamps 1879-1912" published in 2013, has brought all these threads together. His research has indicated that the first printings in around May 1880 were deep mauve and mauve. Note that this contradicts Basset Hull who believed the first printing was in 1881. Scudder believes that there were two printings with an estimated 62,670 stamps issued for postal use.

Regarding Basset Hull's 1881 issue, Scudder notes that between May 1881 and the end of the issue in February 1883, 138,740 stamps were issued for postal purposes and that there were probably four printings. The first printing was deep reddish violet which was very close to the colour proofs approved in April 1881. The shades then became progressively paler, turning from violet to lilac and that one of the printings in the reddish lilac has a somewhat spotty appearance. Scudder contends that the last printing was probably the pale reddish lilac.
Pale Lilac


Deep Violet






Poor centering